Include these authors in your summer reading

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.
As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.
Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 
My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.
Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.
Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]


this is another reason to have dinner as a family and keep the phones away from the table

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.

As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.

Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 

My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.

Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.

Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]

this is another reason to have dinner as a family and keep the phones away from the table

A blog addresses Heartbleed/Password changes that finally consider the computer user’s behavior and not just the the holes in technology.

cmonstah:

I think I know where Piano-Pali got the idea for the new Academy of Motion Pictures Museum. (Via.)

thank you…I really did wonder wtf.  

The Beatles

The Beatles

"It’s not a mascot. It’s a unique performance character."

Forget Valley Girl, everyone in L.A. now speaks “Paltrow.”

Lon Rosen, executive vice president of marketing for the Dodgers, on the team’s new non-mascotbobblehead character (via latimes)

(via latimes)

latimes:

A bilingual Mass was held yesterday at the border fence between Arizona and Mexico in memory of those who entered the U.S. illegally and died crossing the desert. 

The Mass was an attempt by the Catholic Church to call on President Obama to use his executive powers to limit deportations of people who are in the country illegally, reporter Cindy Carcamo writes.

Photos: Cindy Carcamo / Los Angeles Times

Andrew Short, there are many Catholics like me, who thank you for this

andrewshortcomedy:

Most Rev. Dennis M. Schnurr

100 East Eighth Street

Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

Are you there, Archdiocese of Cincinnati? It’s me, Andrew Short. I’m a graduate of Bishop Leibold Elementary School, Archbishop Alter High School, and Xavier University. My brother attended these schools as did my…